Chinese Typesetting and Chinese fonts

Using Chinese fonts in Chinese typesetting

Adelphi has been producing Chinese printed materials for over 20 years; our own in-house typesetting studio produces Chinese typesetting for regular clients such as Disney, HMI Market, the Overseas Development Institute, Hutchison Whampoa Hong Kong and Barclays Bank, to name a few.

Examples of Chinese typesetting by Adelphi

Traditional  (Cantonese) and Simplified (Mandarin) Chinese

The terms “Mandarin” and “Cantonese” refer to spoken Chinese languages, whereas “Traditional” and “Simplified” refers to different writing systems. Mandarin is the official spoken language in mainland China and is written in Simplified script, while Cantonese is used in Hong Kong, Macau and the province Guangdong Hong Kong-based written Cantonese and the Taiwanese variety of Mandarin Chinese both use Traditional characters.

chinese samples

Chinese fonts

Chinese fonts broadly fall into two categories just like Western fonts do. We have serif and sans-serif: think of Arial and Times New Roman. Chinese, on the other hand, has Song (宋体) and Hei (黑体). Where Song is the Chinese equivalent of serif, Hei is akin to sans-serif. For much more detailed information on Chinese fonts, I recommend the blog “The Complete Beginner’s Guide to Chinese Fonts” at webdesign.tutsplus.com

Licensed fonts

Legally, to print your materials for use in the PRC, you must be using fonts that are licensed for use in the territory; otherwise, you will be breaking the licensing agreement of the font manufacturer. Adelphi has over 100 fully-licensed Monotype fonts for use in the PRC.

To see a list of our fully licensed Chinese fonts please click here. There are many manufacturers of Chinese fonts and thousands are available online for free, but you should be careful of these as many have been copied from established font houses and are therefore not licensed for use in mainland China.

The font manufacturer pays the Chinese government for these fonts to be licensed and if you’re not paying to use these, then the Chinese government is not being paid. It’s generally unwise to upset the Chinese government or your client, after all.

To produce and release a professional font, the font house has to create a character set of at least 20,000 characters and ideally, they have to do it twice: once for simplified and once for traditional. This is, as you can imagine, a lot of work. Western fonts do not even come close to this, even with the addition of extended characters and symbols.

If a font of Simplified Chinese is installed into any electronic product for export to the People’s Republic of China, it is necessary to use a font that is authenticated by the Chinese government“.

Many typesetting companies and their clients ignore the licensing agreements and just use any font they have, which can be very risky. Obviously, when dealing with clients such as Disney for their Chinese materials as we have, all work must be above board: therefore we only use fonts that are fully-licensed for use in the PRC. If the fonts are not licensed, you will be in danger of hurting your client legally and financially.

 

Arabic typesetting and Arabic fonts

Arabic fonts when typesetting

Adelphi has been producing Arabic printed materials for over 20 years, our own in-house typesetting studio produces Arabic typesetting for regular clients such as Vidal Sassoon, HMI Market, the Overseas Development Institute, HSBC and Barclays Bank to name just a small selection.

 


Many of the products we produce are of course business orientated and the demand for stylistic Arabic fonts is not often requested and many are happy to use Arial or Times New Roman. But some clients do have specific requirements such as Jaguar Land Rover specified the use of Tahoma and others like Amnesty International have their own Arabic font based on Helvetica.

The most common style of Arabic used is called Nashk and this is used in most Arabic newspapers and other commercial printed materials. There are other styles but these are not used in most everyday commercial Arabic materials.

The five principal Arabic calligraphic cursive styles:
1. Naskh (نسخ nasḫ)
2. Nasta‘liq (نستعلیق nastaʿlīq)
3. Diwani (ديواني dīwānī)
4. Thuluth (ثلث ṯuluṯ)
5. Ruq‘ah (رقعة ruqʿah)

Arabic fonts available:

There are many “Font Houses” that specialise in fonts for specific languages and even Microsoft have their own Arabic range. Recently an Arabic font has been created called Dubai and it was commissioned by the city of Dubai itself and is free to download and use. Some of the bigger font houses such as Monotype have a large selection of Arabic fonts to choose from but please read the license as some of these can be restrictive.

Common problems when typesetting Arabic

Arabic letters are generally not written separately but joined to each other in groups or entire words and unless an Arabic reading software is used then the characters will split into their components.

The example below shows the word ‘August’ in Arabic. The top version is correct, however, the bottom version did not have Arabic InDesign support switched on and has thus been reversed and broken into separate components.

arabic text sample

Also, most industry standard typesetting packages such as Indesign or QuarkXpress will not work with Arabic unless special versions are purchased or the World Ready Composer plugins are used to enable the right to left function. We use the latest version of Adobe InDesign enabled to work with Arabic and all other right to left languages.

What are Arabic numbers?

We often get asked to use Arabic numbers in the document but “Arabic numbers” most commonly refer to the numerals widely used in Europe and the Americas. e.g. 123456789. Whereas the client often wants us to use Arabic-Indic numbers. See the examples below.

arabic numbers

Drop caps and uppercase for emphasis can look great in English, but some languages don’t use them, including Arabic. In these cases, we have to advise the designer the options to give the words a distinctive look without the English options.

Flipping the document from right to left

Arabic typesetting requires flipping the document so it reads right to left, also so it can be read with the correct pagination in place. This can be quite a time consuming if the English original has not been designed with this in mind. The World Ready Composer plugin has a reverse document option but it isn’t perfect and every page has to be checked for consistency.

Japanese Voice Artist

Talented Japanese voice artist Yoshi A

“I have been an actor and voice actor over 20 years in New York and enjoying to work with Adelphi for these couple of years. I love voice works because I can express the world by just my voice and audience can imagine it infinitely.”

Voice artists Adelphi studio

Since arriving in New York from Nara, Japan in 1990, Yoshi has been entertaining audiences as an actor, MC, and samurai martial artist.

As a samurai artist, he was cast for the main role of the TV series, “Samurai Sportsman” (OLN, 2003) and invited as a guest for “The late night with Conan O’Brien” (NBC, 2004), Monday Night Football Promo.

On the other hand, he has been hosting a lot of events and game shows on TV in the US and Europe such as “Big In Japan” for Greece, Sweden, Denmark and Portugal in 2008-2009, and “Japanizi Going Going Gong” (Disney XD) in 2013. He also has been emceeing the Brooklyn Botanic Garden Sakura Matsuri as well as Washington DC.

Language: Japanese

Voice: Lively, deep and authoritative

 


Voice artist selection made easy

1, First choose your language
2, Filter the level of professional experience, dialect. and gender.
4, Click the + to add voices to favourites and these will automatically be included in your quote request.
5, Fill out the rest of the form and we will get back to you with a quote.

Japanese voice artists :

Select a language from the drop-down menu

Male
Female
Clear
Ayaka N pro
Hitomi F pro
Ken C pro
Kimura pro
Kinue K pro
Mahoe pro
Manabu pro
Masashi F pro
Miki pro
Nakayama pro
Oki pro
Reiko pro
Rie H pro
Shun S pro
Yabu pro
Yoko H pro
Yoshi A pro
Yuki pro
Ayaka N pro
Hitomi F pro
Ken C pro
Kimura pro
Kinue K pro
Mahoe pro
Manabu pro
Masashi F pro
Miki pro
Nakayama pro
Oki pro
Reiko pro
Rie H pro
Shun S pro
Yabu pro
Yoko H pro
Yoshi A pro
Yuki pro
Ayaka N pro
Hitomi F pro
Ken C pro
Kimura pro
Kinue K pro
Mahoe pro
Manabu pro
Masashi F pro
Miki pro
Nakayama pro
Oki pro
Reiko pro
Rie H pro
Shun S pro
Yabu pro
Yoko H pro
Yoshi A pro
Yuki pro
Ayaka N pro
Hitomi F pro
Ken C pro
Kimura pro
Kinue K pro
Mahoe pro
Manabu pro
Masashi F pro
Miki pro
Nakayama pro
Oki pro
Reiko pro
Rie H pro
Shun S pro
Yabu pro
Yoko H pro
Yoshi A pro
Yuki pro
Ayaka N pro
Hitomi F pro
Ken C pro
Kimura pro
Kinue K pro
Mahoe pro
Manabu pro
Masashi F pro
Miki pro
Nakayama pro
Oki pro
Reiko pro
Rie H pro
Shun S pro
Yabu pro
Yoko H pro
Yoshi A pro
Yuki pro
Ayaka N pro
Hitomi F pro
Ken C pro
Kimura pro
Kinue K pro
Mahoe pro
Manabu pro
Masashi F pro
Miki pro
Nakayama pro
Oki pro
Reiko pro
Rie H pro
Shun S pro
Yabu pro
Yoko H pro
Yoshi A pro
Yuki pro

Adelphi Studio is a multilingual voice over services agency producing foreign language voice-overs in over 75 languages with over 1,200 voice artists.

From Arabic to Yoruba we have the foreign language voice over talent to suit your production and budget. With more voice samples to choose from than other agencies offering a great range of foreign language voice-over artists to meet your expectations. We also have over 120 foreign accent English speaking voice artists to choose from.


Adelphi offices

Adelphi Studio offers subtitling and voice over services globally from our offices in the UK and the USA.

All US, Canadian, and South American enquiries should be directed to our US office while all other enquiries should go to our UK office.

UK Office
Tel : +44 (0)114 272 3772
Email: sales@adelphistudio.com

US Office
Tel : 916 414 8714
Email: us@adelphistudio.com

Afrikaans Voice Artist on Adelphi Studio

Afrikaans Speaker Pascale

“I love the challenge of breathing life into the written words from a script and ‘hear’ a character emerge. I’m convinced I have one of the most fun jobs in the world!”

Professional voice artist

Pascale has been working as a professional multi-lingual voice over artist and actress since 2003. She can record in English and Afrikaans.

She has also worked as a voice and dialect coach, at various drama and theatre academies, as well as on Martinus Basson and the Handspring Puppet Company’s production of Tall Horse.

Her experience ranges from commercials, documentaries, training dvds, on hold messages, books and animations. One of her favourite jobs is creating character voices and crafting accents from around the world.

Languages: English, Afrikaans

Voice: Female, Crystal clear, friendly, versatile, mid-range

 

 


Voice artist selection made easy

1, First choose your language
2, Filter the level of professional experience, dialect. and gender.
4, Click the + to add voices to favourites and these will automatically be included in your quote request.
5, Fill out the rest of the form and we will get back to you with a quote.

Afrikaans voice artists :

Select a language from the drop down menu

Male
Female
Clear
Carel pro
Louise pro
Louise P - Afrikaans pro
Marinda B pro
Marius C pro
Michelle pro
Pascale - Afrikaans pro
Carel pro
Louise pro
Louise P - Afrikaans pro
Marinda B pro
Marius C pro
Michelle pro
Pascale - Afrikaans pro
Carel pro
Louise pro
Louise P - Afrikaans pro
Marinda B pro
Marius C pro
Michelle pro
Pascale - Afrikaans pro
Carel pro
Louise pro
Louise P - Afrikaans pro
Marinda B pro
Marius C pro
Michelle pro
Pascale - Afrikaans pro
Carel pro
Louise pro
Louise P - Afrikaans pro
Marinda B pro
Marius C pro
Michelle pro
Pascale - Afrikaans pro
Carel pro
Louise pro
Louise P - Afrikaans pro
Marinda B pro
Marius C pro
Michelle pro
Pascale - Afrikaans pro

Adelphi Studio is a multilingual voice over services agency producing foreign language voice-overs in over 75 languages with over 1,200 voice artists.

From Arabic to Yoruba we have the foreign language voice over talent to suit your production and budget. With more voice samples to choose from than other agencies offering a great range of foreign language voice-over artists to meet your expectations. We also have over 120 foreign accent English speaking voice artists to choose from.


Adelphi offices

Adelphi Studio offer subtitling and voice over services globally from our offices in the UK and the USA.

All US, Canadian, and South American enquiries should be directed to our US office while all other enquires should go to our UK office.

UK Office
Tel : +44 (0)114 272 3772
Email: sales@adelphistudio.com

US Office
Tel : 916 414 8714
Email: us@adelphistudio.com

Accented English Voice-Overs

Speaking English with an accent helps to link the world

Firstly it is important to understand what accented English actually is, it isn’t Scouse, Cockney, or Brummie. These are regional accents and although requested fairly regularly, they are not the same as accented English. It is also not, South African, Australian, North American etc. Again these are regional as they are English native speakers. Accented English is, therefore, English spoken with an accent when it is not their native language. People in different countries tend to have a similar English accent which can be recognised, for example, a person from India who produces an English voice-over will maintain an Indian accent which can be recognised as English with an Indian accent.

So what are the needs for accented English? Why not just have a native English speaker perform the English voice-overs? There are a number of reasons that are listed below.

First of all, speaking English with an accent helps to link the world. We live in a globalised society where virtually everything is spread to other countries because English has become the global language then it is often used and recognised. Keeping an accent helps it feel more localised and reach more people.

Another reason is workforce diversity, this links to the above point as many companies have offices globally and a lot use English as their ‘business language’ and as a result, maintaining an accent will help to reach employees and maintain a local feel.

Furthermore, Hollywood often uses accented English for characters in certain regions; if a movie is set in a different country the characters will sometimes have accents from that country but still speak in English. This helps the movie feel more genuine (even if the actor is not from that country).

Finally, accented English can sound more legitimate to a target audience. For example, advertisements or charity campaigns focused on a region may use accented English artists to give it a more legitimate feel. This can help boost marketing and sales as the audience feels like they are receiving information from someone in that country.

There are some commons problems that can arise when using accented English voice-overs. Firstly, faking the accent. The film and TV industry is often guilty of this and has been criticised in the past for adding to stereotypes by putting on an accent, rather than finding someone from that region. There are many cases of actors and actresses butchering the accents as they are unable to completely rid themselves of their native sound. Examples of this are Brad Pitt’s Austrian accent in 7 Years in Tibet and Mickey Rourke’s Russian accent in Iron Man 2.

Another big problem faced when working in accented English is the needs of the client. There is a fine line between having enough of an accent to be recognised but not too much of an accent that it is hard for people to understand the English. Sometimes clients will want the sound to sway towards a harsher accent or a more understandable/English sounding accent. Finding this balance can be very difficult. When selecting an artist it is well worth listening to their English sample and maybe discussing if you need a harsher or softer accent.

A further difficulty can be whether certain words or phrases need an accent at all. For example, if a voice-over is recorded in Dutch-accented English and it contains a company name that needs to be said in the strict English style. This can be a major problem if the country as a whole struggle with certain sounds and these happen to be in the name. An example is how McDonald’s is pronounced around the world, in Korea, it is pronounced mac-don-aye-der and in Singapore mac-donna. These pronunciations are accepted in the countries, this problem basically depends if the client is willing to accept the different pronunciation.

A final common problem is that English accented voice-overs often take more time which is largely due to the artists not being fluent in English and therefore making more mistakes which is completely understandable. A result of this is that pieces are often shorter or sessions may be broken down to allow more time for the artists.

Next time you’re planning your voice-overs, whether as a client or as a voice-talent, keep these points in mind to help your accented English projects be the biggest success they can be.

On-screen text localisation process

How to simplify the On-screen text localisation process

When companies seek to localise the on-screen text (OST) in their videos the process is often misunderstood. It isn’t always a case of just replacing the original text with the translated text and the ease of this depends on a number of factors that original designers may be unaware of and this can cause problems later on. These problems will make the localisation process take longer and also cost more, so it is essential to understand the process and therefore avoid making these mistakes.

First of all, before proceeding with the localisation of OST you should consider the following aspects of your video:

  • Is the text animated? It’s always easier to localise still text rather than animated text. Animations can be very simple… or very complex!!
  • What language are you translating it to? Some words and phrases vary a lot in length between different languages. So you need to keep in mind that when translated, the text size might need to be reduced or increased in order to fit the source video design. Another issue concerning the translation is that the font used on your video may not reproduce the characters correctly in the target language so you’ll need to consider changing it to a more suitable one.
  • Right-to-left or left-to-right languages: The way a translated text is displayed must be taken into account since it would need to be re-adjusted from your original design. For example Arabic is a right to left language so if you need to translate from English to Arabic the text will be written from the opposite side so your design may not look the same or may need to be altered.

The image below shows the difference in text length when working On OST localization.

There are three ways of working with OST localisation:

1 – Working with the original project and footage (the easiest and cheapest process).
2 – Working with a discreet version of the video and re-creating the text style and animations.
3 – Working with the final video, covering or patching the original text and adding the newly translated text on top of it (the most complicated and expensive process).

So what are your options going forward for these three different methods?

1- Working with original projects and footage:

The best way to stay on top of things is to have a clear idea about the final usage of your video when originally designing it. If you know that the text appearing on-screen will eventually be translated into other languages, then make sure you keep your original data/footage and the video editing projects. Remember to ask your video editor/motion graphics designer to keep all the data safe!

Another important thing to keep in mind is that keeping the original material organised and labelled efficiently will make the process much easier and faster.

2 – Working with a discreet video:

Sometimes, video editors or video editing companies are not allowed to give you the projects that they have used for creating the video. If this is the case, you can still ask them to keep a backup copy of all the data. Then when the time comes that you need to localise the OST, you can get in contact with your video editor and ask for a discrete version of the video.

The discreet video would be a version of your video exported without the OST.

For example:

Then you need to deliver the final version of the video in its original language plus the discreet version to the company that is going to translate and localise the text. For example, if you are localising an English OST into a Spanish OST, the English video will be used as a reference for style, font and animation in order to input the Spanish OST, which will be implemented on the discreet video.

Even if you can’t provide the localisation company with the source editing projects, any additional information that you can provide will make a difference in the efforts required for this task. For example, you can provide info like the font used, font style, colour, size, etc.)

If you need to advise creating the discrete version of the video contact a localisation company with your source video and you will receive the specifications needed to successfully produce it!

3 – Working with the source language video:

In the worst case scenario, you might not have access to either the original projects or a discreet version of the video. If this is the case and you still want to proceed with OST localization, there are some things you’ll have to keep in mind:

If the background of the text is a still image or a plain color, the text can probably be localized.

If the background of the text is a moving image, then it is very unlikely that localisation is possible without putting the text into a box and adding the box over the original text. In this case, you can ask the localisation company to provide you with OST alternatives in order to work around the situation whilst maintaining the style of your video.

Here are some visual examples to give you an idea:

A.

In this case, A, the solid dark color behind the text makes it possible to localize, as the source image doesn’t vary throughout the duration of the OST:

(OST localized English to Spanish)

B.

On the example above (B), the text cannot be localized without the projects files/source data or a discreet video because the footage behind it is a moving image. Contact the localization company to ask for alternatives.

Regardless of your requirements and knowledge of on-screen text localization, it is always important to contact a reliable localisation company that can advise you of best practices. It is also worth doing during initial design phases if you suspect that you may require localisation work in the future but maybe not immediately.

 

Russian Voice Artist on Adelphi Studio

Russian Voice Artist Alexey M

“Hi friends, it’s Alexey, Russian voice over talent from Adelphi Studio! If you are looking for a voice for your project, we’ll help you with pleasure”

Alexey has been working with Adelphi for over 2 years now and has helped us with countless projects. His voice is clear and professional, but can adapt to suit your project. Which is why so many of our clients come back and ask for him specifically.

Professional voice artist

Language: Russian, Ukrainian

Voice: Male, deep and trustworthy

Male
Female
Clear
Aaliyah H pro
Abel pro
Abhushan pro
Adam A pro
Adam D pro
Adam S pro
Adel pro
Adi L pro
Adolfo E pro
Adriana P pro
Adriana S pro
Adriana SA pro
African - Kenny D pro
African - Sanjo O pro
African French - Stevy T pro
Afrikaans pro
Afsana pro
Aghi pro
Agnis pro
Ahmed A pro
Ahmed H pro
Aija pro
Aimee L pro
Aivaras pro
Akos H pro
Alang pro
Alba D pro
Albanian - Alba D pro
Alberto L pro
Albina B pro
Aldin pro
Alejandra pro
Alejandra H pro
Aleksandar pro
Aleksandar S pro
Aleksander S pro
Aleksandr K pro
Aleksandra pro
Aleksandra M pro
Alex T pro
Alex W pro
Alexa S pro
Alexander D - Belgian French pro
Alexander D - German pro
Alexander R pro
Alexandra pro
Alexandra G - Italian pro
Alexandra G - Spanish pro
Alexei M pro
Alexey K pro
Alexey M - Russian pro
Alexey M - Ukrainian pro
Allan pro
Allon pro
Alyson S pro
Amharic - Birhanemarian B pro
Amharic - Meseret pro
Amharic - Yaboneh B pro
Amharic Abel pro
Amharic Birhanemarian B pro
Amharic Henok pro
Amharic Liya pro
Amharic Yaboneh B pro
Amharic Zelalem pro
Amina pro
Amit pro
Amogelang pro
Ana pro
Ana R pro
Ana T pro
Ana V pro
Anahit pro
Andrea D pro
Andreas S pro
Andreia S pro
Andrej S pro
Andrew C pro
Andrew C pro
Andrew R pro
Andrew S pro
Andrew U pro
Andrew U pro
Andrey pro
Andrius pro
Andrzej P pro
Andy F pro
Andy Z pro
Aneta B pro
Aneta B - Catalan pro
Aneta P pro
Angel B pro
Anh T pro
Ani pro
Ani D pro
Ani V pro
Anja pro
Anke L pro
Anna B pro
Anna J pro
Anna M pro
Anna N pro
Anna P pro
Anneki pro
Anneminke pro
Annisa pro
Anthony C pro
Anthony L pro
Anthony P pro
Anthony R pro
Anton A pro
Antonio H pro
Antonis pro
Antonis Z pro
Anuprita P - Marathi pro
Ara pro
Arabic pro
Arabic - Ahmed A pro
Arabic - Ahmed H pro
Arabic - Asma O pro
Arabic - Mariam K pro
Arabic - Rawan H pro
Arabic - Reem pro
Arabic - Shady M pro
Arabic - Talal pro
Arabic - Zainab A pro
Arba T pro
Arban pro
Arcindo G pro
Areg pro
Aren pro
Arevik pro
Arief pro
Aris G pro
Arka pro
Arlene T pro
Armida D pro
Arminas B pro
Arnaly A pro
Artemij pro
Artur pro
Artyom S pro
Arvind M - Awhadi pro
Arvind M - Bhojpuri pro
Arvind M - Hindi pro
Arvind M - Punjabi pro
Arvind M - Sanskrit pro
Arvind M - Urdu pro
Arzu pro
Ashim G pro
Ashot pro
Asia pro
Asma B pro
Asma O pro
Assunta E pro
Atli G - Icelandic pro
Atli G - Norwegian pro
Audrey F pro
Audrone pro
Aurelien N pro
Aurimas pro
Ausra pro
Avik C pro
Ayaka N pro
Aziz A pro
Babis H pro
Babita J pro
Baldo P pro
Bandile pro
Bao pro
Barbora pro
Bart H pro
Bartosz G pro
Beatrice M pro
Bella pro
Ben F pro
Benazir B pro
Benjamin pro
Bente L pro
Bente L pro
Beppe C pro
Bertrand pro
Bev S pro
Beydann pro
Bhawani N pro
Bil pro
Birhanemarian B pro
Bita standard
Blanca L pro
Bob B pro
Bojana pro
Bokamoso pro
Bolormaa pro
Boris pro
Borja A pro
Brazilian - Adriana SA pro
Brazilian - Ana R pro
Brazilian - Elise R pro
Brazilian - Fernando R pro
Brazilian - Jo P pro
Brazilian - Joseph C pro
Brazilian - Larissa M pro
Brazilian - Leobaldo pro
Brazilian - Linda C pro
Brazilian - Luis S pro
Brazilian - Marc Z pro
Brazilian - Maria AG pro
Brazilian - Mario C pro
Brazilian - Nina X pro
Brazilian - Roseli C pro
Brazilian - Sumaira pro
Brazilian - Tomas M pro
Brazilian - Victor S pro
Brazilian - Will T pro
Brazilian Portuguese pro
Brian H pro
Brian L pro
Bruno T pro
Bryan O pro
Bulgarian - Ivaylo P pro
Bulgarian - Nikolay pro
Bulgarian - Tzvet pro
Bulgarian - Yuliya S pro
Bzez pro
Bzhar Ar pro
Cagla pro
Candra G pro
Cantonese pro
Cao pro
Cara E pro
Cara J pro
Carel pro
Carlos T pro
Carolyn B pro
Carrie - Gaelic pro
Carrie - Scottish English pro
Casper pro
Catarina S pro
Cátia C pro
Ceire O pro
Ceire O - Gaelic pro
Cem pro
Cesar P pro
Chanmali (Child) pro
Charlie G pro
Che pro
Chen pro
Chida pro
Chinese - Aimee L pro
Chinese - Frank Q pro
Chinese - Inni M pro
Chinese - Kent C pro
Chinese - Seraphin pro
Chinese - Wendy W pro
Chinese - Wenli X pro
Chinese - Zhenyu T pro
Choden pro
Choi pro
Chris J pro
Christian pro
Christiano T pro
Christine M pro
Christoph W pro
Christopher H pro
Cihad İ pro
Cindy pro
Cindy A pro
Claes D pro
Claire D pro
Clarissa pro
Claudia R pro
Claudio A pro
Coco pro
Cortni J pro
Cosmas D pro
Cosmina A pro
Cristina L pro
Cristina S pro
Cristina S - Catalan pro
Cristina SI pro
Croatian - Goran P pro
Croatian - Snjezana pro
Cynthia S pro
Czech - Helens S pro
Czech - Jakub S pro
Czech - Karel W pro
Czech - Michaela B pro
Czech - Radek B pro
Dace B pro
Dagmara pro
Dainis P pro
Dalton pro
Damien pro
Damilola pro
Dan F pro
Dan G pro
Dan W pro
Dana (Child) pro
Dana F pro
Dana Fr pro
Dani B pro
Dani M pro
Daniel B pro
Daniel C pro
Daniel H pro
Daniel P pro
Daniel V pro
Daniela B pro
Daniela T pro
Daniela Tl pro
Daniele S pro
Danish pro
Danish - Diana A pro
Danish - Henrik pro
Danish - Iben pro
Danish - Mille pro
Danish - Sophie M pro
Danish - Thomas L pro
Danish - Trine G pro
Danran pro
Dari - Mustafa H pro
Daris pro
Darius pro
Darren A pro
Dasha CH pro
Dave C pro
Dave W pro
David Cl pro